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Milk Thistle: Herb of the Week

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is one of the simplest herbs to work with, and one of the safest. It’s an excellent herb for beginners to work with, and at the same time it’s one we continue to turn to in our clinical practice, even for very complex cases. Safe and Simple Most herbs don’t work…

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Dandelion: Herb of the Week

Oh, the dandelions! One of our earliest flowers and one of the last to hang on at the end of the season, dandelions (Taraxacum spp.) are with us for most of the year here in New England. They’re cosmopolitan, human-following plants, found all over the world. They’re weeds – that is to say, resilient and…

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Prickly Ash: Herb of the Week

The southern prickly ash (Zanthoxylum clava-herculis) and the eastern prickly ash (Z. americanum) are relatives of the Sichuan hot pepper (Z. simulans, Z. bungeanum). This is a spice, by the way, that is safe for people with nightshade allergies, who shouldn’t consume cayenne or other hot peppers which are in the nightshade family (the Solanaceae).…

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walking on a log

Thinking Holistically Can Change The World

This is an email I just wrote to our Advanced Students. I read several different things this morning that came together in my mind as an illustration of holistic herbalism, and it got me really inspired. When I get inspired, I naturally want to share it with our students, and since this kind of holistic…

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Betony: Herb of the Week

Wood betony is our Herb of the Week this time, and for this one you’ll want to make sure you check the botanical name, because there’s at least one other popular and important herb who goes by the common name “betony”. Which Betony? In this case, we’re referring to Stachys officinalis. (In some older texts…

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Catnip: Herb of the Week

If you watch a cat who’s eaten some catnip (Nepeta cataria), you’ll observe that there’s an initial rolling-rubbing-wriggling response, usually followed by a bout of “the zoomies”, and then a contented curl-purr. The Cats’ Herb There have been many theories over the years about exactly what catnip does to cats and why they like it…

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Motherwort: Herb of the Week

Lion-Hearted Mother Imagine a mother whose child is having a terrible anaphylactic allergy attack, and is being rushed to the hospital. The mother stays close by and tries to keep a brave face: keeping eye contact, holding the child’s hand, speaking soothing reassurances, projecting safety while the medics hover and flit. That’s motherwort mind. Motherwort…

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Sumac: Herb of the Week

Want to make herbal pink lemonade? Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina / R. hirta) is the herb for you! Sour Is Sweet In Summer’s Heat Staghorn sumac is in the Anacardiaceae, the family of plants which includes cashews and poison ivy. It’s a common roadside and greenspace volunteer. Once you learn to see its distinctive horn-shaped…

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Red Seaweeds: Herb of the Week

Continuing with our seaweed explorations from last week, this time we turn to the red seaweeds. Introducing the Reds First, who are we talking about? The red seaweeds we work with most often are dulse (Palmaria palmata), nori (Porphyra umbilicalis), and irish moss (Chondrus crispus). There are lots of others – about 7000 defined species…

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Kelp: Herb of the Week

Not all herbs live on the land! This week we’re featuring kelp, bladderwrack, and all the brown seaweeds. Minerals in Kelp Seaweeds are superfoods, if anything is. All seaweeds used as food or medicine are extremely mineral-rich, often carrying a complement of minerals and trace elements not found easily in land plants. Seaweeds are renowned…

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Red Clover: Herb of the Week

Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is this week’s herb of the week! Infused With Nutrients This red clover is growing right outside the Field’s Corner T station in Dorchester – plants will grow anywhere there’s a bit of dirt. They teach us lessons about persistence. Red clover is a favorite herb for many herbalists, and is…

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Reishi: Herb of the Week

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) is actually a mushroom and not a plant – but hey, the way we define “herb”*, it definitely counts. Acclimate to Altitude It took me a long time to figure out reishi, partly because when you research it, it seems like there’s nothing reishi can’t do – so where do you even…

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Yerba Mate: Herb of the Week

This week’s #herboftheweek is yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis)! A caffeine-bearing plant from South America, this is a particular friend for us “not-a-morning-person” people. Mindful Stimulation You might think mate is just a weak version of coffee – no way! It does have caffeine, though somewhat less than coffee, but it has so much more to…

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Marshmallow: Herb of the Week

In honor of Clara, the awesome editor of our new book, this week marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) is our herb of the week! She was pregnant during the writing and editing phase, and just went on maternity leave. We couldn’t have done this without her, but the coolest thing for us was how enthusiastic she was…

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Introducing our new book – Herbal Medicine For Beginners

Our first book is here! We’re so excited to present our first book, and appropriately for a first book, it starts at the beginning! Herbal Medicine for Beginners is a great book for folks who are completely new to herbalism – and our students have said that it’s also a great, concise reminder of how to keep it…

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Violet: Herb of the Week

Violet (Viola odorata) is one of the first plants up in the spring, and we’re always so happy to see it each year! Flower Art Violet is one of many plants that make art: the beautiful purple flower is not actually its reproductive flower. There’s a second flower that happens later in the season, which…

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White Pine: Herb of the Week

White pine is one of my very favorite herbal teas – it’s so delicious! “Like drinking a Christmas tree” might not sound super appealing, but give it a try sometime. I bet you’ll love it. A Giving Tree Not only that, white pine has a lot to offer, starting with its needles. You don’t even…

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Solomon’s Seal: Herb of the Week

Next week is the Boston Marathon, and we’re prepping for a class on runner’s health at a local sports club – and that means, solomon’s seal is our herb of the week this time! Why? Because solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum, P. multiflorum) is one of the best plants I know for joint health. Joint Healing…

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Centaury: Herb of the Week

Centaury (Centaurium erythraea) was Ryn’s very first “herb of the month” when he began studying herbal medicine, and now it’s our herb of the week! Chiron’s Gift Originally, Ryn was drawn to this herb because it has centaurs in the name – and that’s as good a reason as any! Why centaurs? It’s rooted in…

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Plantain: Herb of the Week

The common plantain plants – Plantago major & P. rugelii & P. lanceolata – are medicinially identical, so we’ll cover all of them together in our entry this week. Break Up Biofilms When we say “plantain”, you might think of those little banana-like fruits – but that’s not the plantain we mean. Instead, we’re referring…

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Meadowsweet: Herb of the Week

This week’s featured herb is meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria)! A Boon for Braces Meadowsweet has been one of my best friends on this whole orthodontics experience. It’s so soothing to the irritated insides of my cheeks, I can’t even tell you. It drastically reduces the pain, and noticeably speeds healing. When my braces are really bothering…

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Basil: Herb of the Week

Garden basil (Ocimum basilicum) may seem like just an ingredient in pesto, but wait! There’s more to this week’s herb! Mood Lifter One of my favorite things about basil is its ability to uplift the spirit – much like its close relative, tulsi (Ocimum sanctum). During stretches of grey weather in the winter, I find…

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Calamus: Herb of the Week

Calamus (Acorus calamus) is this week’s herb of the week! There is so much amazing about calamus, but the reason I picked it for this week is that we’re kicking off a Whole30, and calamus is a big help when you’re kicking the sugar habit. So here we go, calamus: let’s get through this week…

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Linden: Herb of the Week

Also known as basswood, lime flower, and tilleul, linden – Tilia spp. – is our herb of the week this time. A Hug In A Mug We like to call linden “a hug in a mug”, and I don’t know what I would do without it! This morning was a perfect linden day: I woke…

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Sage: Herb of the Week

Sage is the other plant in our logo – lavender for me, and sage for ryn. Sage was one of his very first herb-of-the-month plants when he was first learning herbalism, and at the time, it wasn’t really a plant that I worked with much. I’d had a lot of teachers who revered sage, but…

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Lavender: Herb of the Week

Lavender is one of the plants in our logo, and has been since I began working as an herbalist. When I first started practicing, I wanted to choose a plant that would be relevant. I loved the stories about old apothecaries who had signs without words, because the general population didn’t read, but they were…

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St. John’s Wort: Herb of the Week

The St. John’s Wort card in my oracle deck says: blooming at the height of summer, St. John’s Wort is like solar batteries, ready aid when everything is grey and damp. St. John’s Wort has been touted for depression, but its function is more about the gut than the brain – and so are our…

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fennel and beetle

Fennel: Herb of the Week

Winter is the Fennel time of year! Fennel is a warming herb that improves digestion and liver function, which is why you see it in recipes for sausage and other heavy or fatty meats. Fennel is particularly suited to the cold, stagnant digestive conditions that we see so commonly in our culture today. A lot…

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inula

Elecampane: Herb of the Week

If you listened to last Friday’s podcast, you know that Ryn was sick last week with what we affectionately called the “Lung Crud Plague”. If you’re also sick with lung crud, Elecampane is the herb for you! But before we talk about the why, let’s just get this right out in the open: Elecampane tastes…

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ashwagandha seedling

Ashwagandha: Herb of the Week

Ashwagandha is one of my very favorite herbs: it supports the adrenals and other endocrine organs, improving the function of those organs and helping the body to better cope with stress. You’ve probably heard about the “HPA axis” – which is the connection recognized between the hypothalamic, pituitary, and adrenal glands. But I submit that…

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Gah! Gout! Simple Herbs for Gout and Kidney Support

Pain in your toe? It could be gout. This relatively common issue presents as recurrent attacks of acute inflammatory joint pain. The big toe is the most common site of pain – up to half of all gout cases only show up there. What is Gout? Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid…

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hawthorn berries

Hawthorn: Herb of the Week

Hawthorn is often categorized as an “exhilarant” in old herbal literature – strongly uplifting to the spirit. Along with Rose, Vanilla, Vetiver, and others, Hawthorn is a great “rescue remedy”. Whether it’s sadness from a deep loss or just baked-on, caked-on gloom and doom, Hawthorn can help. I love to make an elixir of Hawthorn…

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pecan pie bars

Pretty Paleo Pecan Pie Bars

OMG, these are delicious! This all started because I saw a recipe for Paleo Pecan Bars, and I was excited! Delicious, I thought! But there was a lot of stuff in there that just wasn’t food, in the name of “it’s not really sugar”, and there was a ton of cream and butter – two…

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prunella in iceland

Self-Heal: Herb of the Week

Self Heal, Prunella vulgaris, is one of those plants that seems able to do everything. Writing in the 16th century, Gerard said that no herb equals Self Heal for healing wounds, and a whole host of other things. Self Heal is used all over the world – by Native Americans, Europeans, and all across Asia,…

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garden variety thyme

Herbs for Colds and Flu

Winter’s coming here in the Northeast, and along with that comes the standard “seasons changing” illnesses: the flu, colds, ear infections, sore throats, and lung gunk. Here are some easy remedies that you can try for your family next time something’s going around! Ear Infections As a child, I was particularly prone to ear infections,…

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herbal preparations

How to Pay for Herb School: Herbal Support Boxes!

Excited about the prospect of going to Herb School, but not sure how to pay for it? Why not crowd source your tuition? It’s not just a great way to raise funds, but it’s also an excellent study tool! Imagine it like this: You’re going to school to learn all about herbs, how to work…

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ground ivy Charles River

Ground Ivy: Herb of the Week

Ground Ivy, Glechoma hederacea, is a small, unassuming little plant. You might know it as “Creeping Charlie” or “Gill-Over-The-Ground”, or (if you’re from England) as “Alehoof”. It often grows low to the ground, spreading horizontally instead of vertically – but if it’s in an area that isn’t mowed too often, it’ll stand up for a…

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icelandic angelica

Angelica: Herb of the Week

I didn’t really understand Angelica until I went to Iceland, but since then, I can’t get enough of it! Angelica LOVES Iceland, and it grows as tall as me – or taller. It’s got a strong, tall stalk and huge flower head, with leafy arms that reach for the sky and the sun that never…

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burdock seeds

Dying Back

as herbalists, we are closely tied to the plants, and to the cycles of the year. it’s appropriate to take time to contemplate those cycles sometimes! herbalism is also an exercise in self-mastery: not the bludgeon of discipline (though discipline is often good), but the more compassionate acknowledgement of who we are as individuals, of…

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Rose: Herb of the Week

A lot of people think of Roses when they think of Valentine’s Day, but there is so much more about Rose to love! Let’s start with the thorns – which you might think is somewhat strange, but the thorns are exactly what makes Rose such an amazing protector of small furry creatures and little feathered…

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Nettle in Flower

Nettle: Herb of the Week

Nettle is one of the most loved herbs – and there’s so much to love! For starters, Nettle is one of the most super of all the super foods. High in vitamins, minerals, even protein – Nettle is deeply nourishing. According to the USDA, “Nettle is probably one of the richest sources of minerals among…

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mullein flowers

Mullein: Herb of the Week

Mullein is a fuzzy plant that starts out small, but in its second year can grow over six feet tall! Mullein is a good friend to people who challenge their lungs – whether it’s with smoke, particulate, or any other crud we breathe in. It’s particularly great when that “crud” is dry, dusty, and caked…

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arctic thyme

Thyme: Herb of the Week

Thyme remains one of my very favorite herbs for colds, the flu, and other respiratory gunk. Thyme has a very high volatile oil content – in other words, the constituents that make it smelly – and those volatile oils are super anti-microbial. The trick is, you have to get them in contact with the microbes…

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ginger slices

Ginger: Herb of the Week

There’s so much to say about Ginger, so I’ll start with something unexpected: believe it or not, Ginger is one of my favorite herbs to help me get to sleep at night. Why? Because it’s strongly antispasmodic – which means that it helps tense muscles relax. Whether those muscles are crampy gut muscles, crampy skeletal…

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Yarrow: Herb of the Week

Yarrow, Achillea millefolium, is a warrior’s plant. Named for Achilles, the mythological Greek hero of the Trojan War who was nearly invulnerable in battle. And for centuries, Yarrow has been considered “battlefield medicine”, because of its ability to staunch the flow of blood. How does it work? I like to describe it like this: Yarrow…

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chamomile bunch

Chamomile: Herb of the Week

I once had a client who said, “and don’t you go telling me I need something stupid like Chamomile! this is a serious situation!” And all I could think was, “Wow, you actually DO need chamomile!”

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Goldenrod: Herb of the Week

Goldenrod, Solidago spp., is a super important herb in our apothecary. It’s delicious and so helpful in so many ways!

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Elder: Herb of the Week

Elder, Sambucus canadensis, nigra, is one of our favorite herbs. You may have heard that elderberry syrup can help with the flu. You may have wondered, is that actually true? IT IS! Elderberries are chock full of vitamin C and anthocyanins, which are antioxidant. Both of these are great for supporting good health every day.…

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Purple Loosestrife: Herb of the Week

Purple loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria, is an under-appreciated herb, and it’s been villianized with the tag “invasive”. That label in general is really problematic for me, because plants aren’t native to locations, they’re native to growing conditions: if we change the conditions, the plants will change too! A great book on this topic is Where Do…

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Calendula: Herb of the Week

Calendula is the herbal (and botanical) name for pot marigold: Calendula officinalis. It’s not only good at keeping pests off your tomato plants, it has a whole host of medicinal actions. Calendula is commonly made up into an oil or salve, and is useful for just nearly anything that happens to your skin. Campfire burns,…

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Boston for West Virginia

Last year Ryn went to Coal River Valley, West Virginia as part of an Herbal Medics team doing free clinic and community education work for communities affected by mountain top removal. Throughout the year, people in the community who were interested in learning have been studying online with us for free to build their herbal…

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Mugwort for Dreaming

Fiona Apple says, i’ve got my feet on the ground and i don’t go to sleep to dream. But, sometimes, you do. The Uses of Dreaming Those who cannot attain or are denied normal REM sleep suffer deeply, as they lose out on the mood-regulatory functions of dreaming. Dreams are an opportunity for the subconscious…

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Savoring Salicylates

Who’s Afraid of Phytochemistry? part 1 of ?   Don’t let the diagrams scare you! Don’t let the long names drive you away. Phytochemistry can be intimidating at a first look, but it does have some useful insights to offer even the most folksy of healers. The best parts of it are those that bear…

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I Can’t Believe I’m Getting Braces

I recently told a friend that I’m getting braces and I thought she’d make some comment about how braces are for kids and I’m too old. Instead she said, “Wow! That’s a lot of progress for you! I never thought you’d ever do something like that!” Which made no sense to me, because, of course…

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Herbs for National Take Your Daughter To Work Day!

I LOVED Take Your Daughter To Work Day when I was a kid (thanks, Dad!! <3), and today, my daugther Amber came to the school with me to talk about our favorite herbs! To be fair, through Amber’s life, most days were take my daughter to work days, and she was always super helpful. I…

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Herbs for Passover: Horseradish, Parsley, and Chicory!

Check out the whole Herbal Holidays video playlist here!

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Go-To Joint Liniment

A good herbal joint liniment can make the difference between a slow, drawn-out, and incomplete healing process and one that proceeds quickly to complete recovery. A liniment, as I use the term, means a combination of an herbal infused oil with some herbal tinctures, and usually some essential oils as well. The combination works better…

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Ostara and Nettles: An Herby Holiday Video!

An herbal tribute to the Spring Equinox! There are more free videos for you at our YouTube channel!

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Not Everything Is Going To Be Perfect.

For those of us who are actively experimenting and taking action to improve our health, who are carefully noticing that what we eat or how we sleep or how we live affects our well-being, who are researching and learning about ways to be healthier: Often there is an expectation, not always consciously, that if we…

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My Favorite Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free Substitutes

Even if you avoid gluten and dairy products, sometimes you still want a bagel and cream cheese. Obviously, gluten free/dairy free substitute treats are still usually sugary and high in refined carbs, but sometimes that’s exactly what you want. Here’s my personal list of the best gluten free and dairy free stuff. Everything on the…

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Fun Free Videos!

This year, we’ve been making short herbal videos to celebrate every holiday we can think of! We pick one or two herbs for each one and talk about them, so you can have some fun learning about holidays and herbs together! Here’s our most recent one about Hops for St. Patrick’s Day: And you can…

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plant escaping

Trauma and Story

As an herbalist in these times, the reality is that we deal with trauma, and the effects of trauma on people’s lives. Herbs play a big role in that work – especially our good friends Tulsi, Ashwagandha, Wood Betony… But story, the way a person understands the things that they have experienced, is also a…

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A Tea for Change

Ok, you guys. I’ve been eating WAY too much sugar lately, and it’s time to reign that in. So this morning I woke up, made a good breakfast heavy on the protein and good fats, plus an apple – cause you know what they say about an apple a day… And I made myself a…

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De-stigmatizing Self-Harm

If the first thing we think when we hear the words self-harm is something like cutting, or drug or alcohol abuse, especially if those are things that either are not part of our life experience (so we may see them as “things other people do but I wouldn’t do”) or if those things have been…

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Harm Reduction for Everyone

Usually, when you hear the words “harm reduction”, you’re thinking about illegal drugs or perhaps alcohol abuse. Needle exchange is a good example: if someone is going to inject drugs, let’s at least be sure that they aren’t also injecting disease – less disease is less harm. But the truth is, we all self-harm. It’s…

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notCoffee

notCoffee is notBad!

As promised in the post about moving your body in spite of body issues, here is my recipe for notCoffee. No, it’s not coffee. But it’s not bad! In fact, I LOVE it!

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Movement for People who Hate to Move

I LOVE Katy Bowman. Like, a lot. Like, I wish I could buy a house next-door to her so we could be besties. Instead, we live on opposite ends of the continent and have never met in person. Almost! I was a part of her very first become-a-practitioner online class, and I even had the…

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Ginger Chamomile Cookies

Ginger Chamomile is my favorite after dinner or bedtime tea. Today I decided to try it as a cookie!

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N’Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Yesterday, we were really craving oatmeal raisin cookies, but I typically avoid oats, even gluten free oats. So we made them with no oats at all, and you can too! Sliced almonds give it that oatmeal texture; you can break them up a little bit to be closer in size to oatmeal, or leave them…

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Paleo Apple Fritters

OMG. This morning I was getting some groceries, and there were apple fritters for some reason in the produce section. Probably to tempt people who are trying to avoid baked goods. But suddenly it occurred to me: I could totally make those. So I did.

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Raspberry Cream Cheese Danish. Really.

Gluten free? Dairy free? Paleo? Yup! These Raspberry Cream Cheese Danishes are exactly what you need. Because I wanted to stay as low-carb as possible, I chose to go with almond flour for this recipe, which makes a much denser danish than you could do if you were using tapioca or rice flour. But what…

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Toxins and Terrain

When someone starts to talk about detoxification or cleansing, I often find myself st[r]uck with a question: “What do you mean when you use that word, toxins?” (With echoes of that movie line – you know the one – in the back of my mind.)

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What to Do When You’ve Been Glutened

Even the most assiduous label-readers among us sometimes miss “barley malt” buried in an ingredients list, or trust the word of a well-meaning friend who’s sure there’s no wheat in the soup . . . only to find out later that there was spelt, or rye, or whatever. Maybe all you saw was “gluten-free” on…

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First Aid Kits For Everyone!

Why should you carry a first aid kit? Think about the places you go every day – the grocery store, a restaurant, the subway, a kids’ soccer game: if something happened, do you know where to find a first aid kit? If you did find one, would you know how to use it? Would it…

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You’re a Trainwreck.

Hi. My name is Katja. I’m a total Trainwreck. Hi, Katja…

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Farm Food February: The Wrap Up

Well, the February Farm Food project is over. Our meat still comes from Chestnut Farms, like it does every month, and we still receive our regular vegetable CSA delivery – at least for one more week. Then we don’t have vegetable CSA produce again until probably June: that is the way of New England! But…

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Varicose Veins: The Updated Post

The original varicose veins post is by far the most popular thing on this blog. Which makes me really sad – I would so much rather people flock in droves to this one: Enough. Or the one about the Merits of Plain Speech. Or the one about the Beauty of Imperfection and Gracelessness. But no,…

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Don’t Just Stand There!

Standing desks are all the rage, and we love ours. Recently I’ve seen several Kickstarter campaigns for standing desk toys – things to stand on so that you’re not just standing on a flat boring surface. Flat boring surfaces are easy to vacuum, but they’re not so good for your feet. The feet are extremely…

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Farm Food Update #2

Well, it’s the middle of the month, and this project has been quite a project so far! With all the snow, things have gone not quite the way we expected, but we’ve gotten through. Our Meat CSA delivery from Chestnut Farm was delayed again due to Snowpocalypse: The Return of the Revenge Part 4, so…

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Coconut Treats

I was just writing to a client about ways to increase coconut oil in her diet, and I thought I should share with the class. A lot of people enjoy coconut oil in savory dishes, such as eggs or chicken, but I really don’t, so I’ve come up with some other ways to get my…

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February Food Project Update: Week One

The first week of our Farm Food February project has been very successful, and very enlightening! Also, challenging.

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Farm Food February

Each year, our students do projects related to food, lifestyle, sleep, and more. All of our students do these projects, though they vary slightly from group to group. We do them each year too, different projects with different groups so that we can be in solidarity with each of them. When the Second Year students…

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Motivation to Succeed

Whether you’re an herbalist or a parent (or a teacher, or anyone who works to educate and motivate people!), motivating the people you work with to succeed is often the hardest part. You can research all the best answers, you can compile great masses of data, you can even get your client to agree that…

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herbal preparations

Herbalism and the Law: The Practice of Medicine in Massachusetts

The most common way an herbalist can find herself in a court of law is by appearing, intentionally or unknowingly, to be practicing medicine without a license; the evidence against the herbalist in cases of this nature tends to hinge on the use of certain restricted terms. (Roger Wicke has written an extensive and expertly-argued…

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Phoenix Cookies

Tonight, we’re teaching our Food Allergies for the Holidays class – we teach it every year, but every year the recipe list gets longer as we come up with more and more delicious holiday treats!

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Tapeworm? No problem!

Our dog… You know, some people love fine wines. Some people appreciate fancy truffle oil. Our dog, she loves goose poop. I don’t know what it is, but she seems to think it is the tastiest of all delicacies. Yuck. And of course, here in Boston, there’s no shortage of goose poop. Which makes Elsie…

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Tea of the Month: April

You can tell a lot about a person from what’s in their teacup. Here’s a peek into ours!

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Muffin Madness!

Love muffins? Tired of eggs and bacon for breakfast? Committed to sticking to your paleo* diet? Then you, my friend, have come to the right place.

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Trademarking Tradition: the Fire Cider® Controversy

[For the purposes of this discussion, let’s use fire cider to refer to the traditional herbal medicine preparation, “fire cider” to refer to the term, and Fire Cider® to refer to the company who have trademarked the term.] Fire cider is a traditional preparation of various spicy and pungent herbs macerated in vinegar and honey.photo…

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Paleo Pumpkin Muffins!

It’s almost Thanksgiving and that means, among other things, PUMPKIN! Pie isn’t the only thing you can do with pumpkin – in fact, I like pumpkin bread and pumpkin muffins much better. If you do too, here’s a great recipe – it can be bread or muffins depending on which baking implement you use! Start…

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Men’s Cycles and Self-Reliance

Often, discussions of “women’s health” or “men’s health” are limited to the reproductive systems. When I teach about men’s reproductive health, I like to include an overview of common problems for men, because sexual function is dependent on the vitality of the rest of the body. But even before I get to that, I start…

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The Beauty of Imperfection and a Tea for Gracelessness

I teach, a lot. Life as a teacher essentially means being on stage, most of the time. My students and my clients have images of me in their minds, and I’m quite certain that those images are better than what I really am, or that they are taking their image of my Best Self and…

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Gut-Heal Tea

Eliminating food allergens from the diet can bring substantial relief from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders such as IBS, Crohn’s disease, and celiac. These ill-tolerated foods – the gluten in wheat and other grains, the casein and lactose in dairy, and others – can initiate destructive processes that irritate the stomach lining, compromise the intestinal wall, and…

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Enough.

We are a culture of More. We like words like SuperSize, Maximize, and Fullest Potential. We like, whether we admit it or not, concepts like Planned Obsolescence, because it allows for words like New, Shiny, Improved, and of course, Shopping. We believe things like “You can never be too rich, or too thin”. We, as…

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On the Merits of Plain Speech

Words are pretty amazing things. We can use them to make people feel good about themselves, or awful. We can use them to bring people together, or to divide. The way we speak when we’re working with people – regardless of profession – says a lot about not only what we think of our position…

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Green Cleaning

When I was a kid, we had “Mr. Yuk” stickers. Mr. Yuk was a sickly neon-green and black circle with a very distinctive frowny yuck face, and was, before emoticons and internationalized language-free signage, a recognizable symbol for children to say that this item was poisonous.

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On the Merits of Fluctuation

This week, one of my pharmacy students stayed after class to ask for help. She wanted me to explain about the way insulin is supposed to cycle in the body again, because she has a friend who is a young doctor, and they had gotten into a disagreement. The young doctor friend claimed that a…

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Classroom Experiment: Kadha (Fried Dumplings)

Today my Pharmacy students and I tried out a Thanksgiving experiment. Last week two students referenced a traditional Iraqi/Iranian treat, which is made with dates and almonds. We all agreed that replicating this recipe in paleo fashion would be just the thing for the week of Thanksgiving – and we were right!

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Chai for a Busy Day

Chai is delicious. But it’s even better when your Chai will get you through your most stressed-out overwhelmed craziness day, and this recipe will do just that!

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herbal medicine for beginners - book cover

Our Book is Now Available on Amazon.com

Our first book is here!

This is the perfect introduction to a powerful yet manageable apothecary of 35 herbs and teach you how to apply them to common ailments.

We keep it simple and practical, and along the way teach you how to think effectively about herbs & herbalism, laying the foundations for deeper study.

The book is available through Amazon.com

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